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Alabama girl injured in car accident gets new hand

| Dec 11, 2012 | Car Accidents

Individuals involved in car accidents are often subject to a variety of injuries. Injuries including those to the head, neck and spine are among the most serious and life altering. While not typically life-threatening, injuries that result in amputation often require an individual to undergo years of physical therapy and rehabilitation.

At a time when most 16-year-old girls are thinking about getting their driver’s license, dating boys and having fun with friends, one Alabama girl has very different concerns. Injured in a rollover car accident, the 16-year-old girl is now more concerned with learning to write and tie her shoes again.

The young girl was a passenger in a car that was involved in a serious rollover accident last year. While thankfully she lived, the accident left her right hand severely damaged. Immediately following the accident, the girl was rushed to the emergency room where doctors were forced to amputate two of her fingers. After attempts to save two additional fingers failed, doctors were then forced to amputate them as well leaving her only with a thumb on her right hand.

Thanks to monies raised and donated from a local Rotary club, the girl was recently outfitted with a myoelectric prosthetic hand. The new hand cost $112,000, the majority of which was not covered by insurance. Without the support of those within the girl’s community, she would not have been able to afford the hand that now offers her a chance at living a normal life.

Individuals who are passengers in vehicles involved in car accidents may chose to pursue legal action against those individuals responsible for causing the accident. Monies recovered through a personal injury claim can help cover costs related to medical bills, physical therapy and pain and suffering.

Source. Alabama Live, “Hoover teen Haley Higdon gets $112,000 prosthetic hand,” Jon Anderson, Dec. 1, 2012

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